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SOUTHWEST JOURNAL OF LINGUISTICS

THE JOURNAL OF THE LINGUISTIC ASSOCIATION OF THE SOUTHWEST


1997 Abstracts, Volumes 1-2.



PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS
A HALLIDAYAN FUNCTIONAL DISCOURSE ANALYSIS THAT TEACHES A MINOR GENRE AND MORE
CAROLYN G. HARTNETT
College of the Mainland

ABSTRACT. This discourse analysis illustrates aspects of Hallidayan Systemic Functional Linguistics (SFL) by using it to analyze a call for manuscripts for the Southwest Journal of Linguistics (SWJL). SFL considers the influences of contexts, purposes, reader-writer relationships, and other texts in creating genres. An analysis of the genre of 'calls for manuscripts' reveals the types of things that inexperienced student writers need to be taught explicitly to write in genres that they have not read extensively: the specific content, vocabulary, and syntactic patterns that have the intended effects on readers. Thus SFL has a broad educational value in addition to its potential for explaining how people use language to make and communicate meanings.

TERRITORIALITY, RELATIONSHIPS, AND REPUTATION: THE CASE OF GLADYS A. REICHARD
JULIA S. FALK
Michigan State University

ABSTRACT. There is an intriguing paradox in the reputation and reception of Gladys Amanda Reichard (1893-1955) and her work on Native American languages. Her 1938 grammar of Coeur d'Alene has long been held in high regard by Salish specialists, and the work remains viable today. In contrast, her 1951 Navajo grammar and her earlier articles on Navajo language were severely criticized, especially by Harry Hoijer, who in 1973 literally wrote Reichard out of the history of Native American linguistics. The sources of this discredit and neglect are here traced, through letters, a manuscript, and various publications by and about Reichard, to territoriality and personal relationships that affected her professional life beginning with her days as a graduate student with Franz Boas and involving Edward Sapir and, later and to a lesser extent, Margaret Mead. Viewing Reichard's work not through Hoijer's narrow lens of mid-century structuralism but more generously in a context that includes the personal as well as the strictly scientific recreates for her Navajo linguistic studies the potential that Lamphere's reexamination suggests for Reichard's anthropological work on Navajo culture (Lamphere 1993).

RAZORING THE EUTHETIC NETWORK OF LANGUAGE
EARL M. HERRICK
Texas A&M University - Kingsville

ABSTRACT. The author of Sociolinguistic Variation: A Formal Model (U Alabama Press 1984) discusses four reviews of his book, which proposed that a euthetic network should be added to the usual stratificational model of language in order to handle certain kinds of linguistic phenomena. The book's author describes in detail the operations of the new nodes that he proposed for the euthetic network, compares them to other stratificational nodes, and, pace the reviewers, points out why a terminology as complicated as that which appears in his book is needed for describing this part of the linguistic model. He also discusses the need for probabilistic alternations within stratificational networks and otherwise comments on the four reviews.

COMMENTS ON HERRICK'S 'RAZORING THE EUTHETIC NETWORK OF LANGUAGE'
PAM COPE
Summer Institute of Linguistics

NO ABSTRACT

DIVERGENT TWINS: ISLEÑO AND BRULE SPANISH IN LOUISIANA
CHARLES HOLLOWAY
Northeast Louisiana University

ABSTRACT. The Brule and Isleño dialects were transported to Louisiana from the Canary Islands at precisely the same time in the latter part of the 18th century. In the intervening two hundred years, these two dialects have remained relatively isolated from each other. The number of speakers of each has dwindled thereby bringing them to the brink of linguistic extinction. Although both dialects exhibit unmistakable evidence of their common Canary Island origins, each has distinctive lexical, phonological, and syntactic features. Some of these unique elements result from language contact with Acadian French and English, while others are associated with language death phenomena. Brule and Isleño offer insight into the nature and rate of progression of such changes in dying languages.

PHYSICAL PARAMETERS BEHIND THE STOP-SPIRANT ALTERNATION IN SPANISH
KIRK A. WIDDISON
Brigham Young University and Illinois State University

ABSTRACT. Spanish voiced stops exhibit [+ continuant] allophonic variants in phonetic environments that vary across modern speech varieties. Quantitative research suggests that spirantization originates in post-vocalic position and is currently spreading to other contexts of decreasing sonority, i.e. after segments such as glides, liquids, and [s]. Formal analysis equates this generalizing trend with phonological remapping wherein rule simplification now overrides strictly phonetic conditioning to extend spirants to less natural contexts. I contend that variation in voiced stops and spirants continues to be associated very directly with physical factors in speech production as circumscribed by five phonetic correlates of spoken language constraining these sounds. The same parameters governing the traditional stop/spirant alternation induce similar variation in other fricatives and glides, where the [-continuant] variant is derived. The progressive widening domain of spirants is consistent with the gradient physiological requirements of stop production in coarticulated speech and need not be ascribed to a move towards economy in formal representation.



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